Food Trek: Starfruit And Pomelos

Trusted Health Products

We've all done it: wandered through an international farmers market gawking at some of the strange and exotic fruits, fishes, meats, cheeses, teas, herbs, spices, and veggies on tantalizing display. As we wandered, wed wonder how this one tastes and how that one is prepared, but many of us never took that next step: buying and trying it. Perhaps its time to boldly go where our gastronomical curiosity has never gone before! 

Starfruit

Classic example: starfruit. Its distinctive shape is engaging, but what to do with it? Just ask folks in the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, India, and Bangladesh. These countries are where carambolas, also known as starfruit, originated and remain a favorite ingredient in preserves, relishes, and juice drinks. Over time they've become popular in Southeast Asia, the South Pacific, Latin America, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, Haiti, Trinidad, China, Guam, and the U.S.

The whole fruit is edible including its waxy skin. Its meat is firm, crunchy, and juicy. Ripe starfruit is sweet; its flavor often described as an admixture of apple, grape, pear, and citrus. Unripened starfruit is firmer and sour like a green apple.

In Southeast Asia, ripe carambola may be cooked with cloves and apples. Chinese chefs add it to fish. Unripened carambola are added to relish dishes in Australia. Thai cooks add them to shrimp dishes. The juice is great for drinks and sorbets.

Carambolas are full of antioxidants, including polyphenolic antioxidants, which means they're helpful in reducing inflammation and may help prevent heart disease. They also contain potassium and vitamin C. Their antimicrobial properties help fight disease and infection by bacteria like E. coli.

Pomelos

If a pear and a grapefruit had a kid, itd probably be a pomelo - at least that's how this curious looking fruit appears. Born in Southeast Asia, pomelos, or Citrus maxima, taste like grapefruit, and are popular in desserts, salads, and fruit drinks.

 The skin of the pomelo is not edible without processing; for example, it can be preserved to make marmalade or candied to make a sweet treat. The meat is milder and not as bitter as some grapefruit; white pomelo meat is sweet; pinkish pomelo flesh is slightly sour.

Pomelos are a good source of vitamins B and C, and carotene. Their potassium content can help lower blood pressure; and the vitamin C can put blood cholesterol in check. 

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Reviewed By:

Founder Ray Spotts has a passion for all things natural and has made a life study of nature as it relates to health and well-being. Ray became a forerunner bringing products to market that are extraordinarily effective and free from potentially harmful chemicals and additives. For this reason Ray formed Trusted Health Products, a company you can trust for clean, effective, and healthy products. Ray is an organic gardener, likes fishing, hiking, and teaching and mentoring people to start new businesses. You can get his book for free, “How To Succeed In Business Based On God’s Word,” at www.rayspotts.com.


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