A Sedentary Lifestyle Ages You Faster

A body at rest, stays at rest. A body in motion, stays in motion.

A common and quite readily used phrase to promote the importance of activity and movement in everyday life, which speaks to precisely what a recent study has found. While a good portion of our society has jobs where they have to sit for hours on end, many don't truly understand the stress and consequences on the body this type of lifestyle leads to. A new study found that too much sitting can actually increase biological aging. So not only is it not good for physical health, it could result in getting older more rapidly, leading to serious illnesses and ailments.

At the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, researchers studied elderly women who sit for more than 10 hours a day and have a general low level of physical activity. What they found was startling. The research showed that the cell activity in these individuals is much lower, and even biologically older, by nearly eight years compared to women who were more active and sat less during the day. In a journal published earlier this year, it was discovered that a mere 40 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per day can help to boost women out of this detrimental and harmful bracket.

Chromosome Deterioration

One of the reasons researchers say this is an issue is due to the deterioration of necessary chromosomes that influence the aging process. When cells age, they can naturally fray and shorten. There are many different factors that can contribute to this type of outcome. One of those factors is lifestyle which is directly related to the amount of physical activity and exercise. Poor lifestyle choices can lead to further deterioration.

Things like obesity and smoking can also spur on that process as well. When these chromosomes are compromised, illnesses can also be a higher likelihood. Health conditions such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer can more easily exist and prosper in a compromised system.

Our study found cells age faster with a sedentary lifestyle. Chronological age doesn't always match biological age, said Aladdin Shadyab, PhD, one of the primary researchers in the study out of the medical school in San Diego. He and his team made it their mission to measure the aging biomarker as closely as they could. The study comprised of almost 1,500 women over the age of 64. Numerous questionnaires and preliminary health tests were conducted to gauge specific indicators. Sleeping hours were also tracked.

Almost immediately, it became very clear when the women were questioned about how much sitting they do during the day or how much exercise they get that their results were conclusive with similar patterns. The women who lead very active lives, who got in walks, good sleep or other various forms of exercise had a much younger age reading, regardless of biological age.

This speaks so directly and staunchly to the overarching and intense need for physical activity to aid physical mobility and even internal health. The body is all interconnected. It makes perfect sense that what you do on the outside reverts back onto the inside and vice versa. Everything we do plays a role - diet, exercise, supplements, toxic exposure, and all other lifestyle variables.

 

 

 

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