8 Ways To Relieve And Prevent Sensitive Teeth

Sensitive teeth can be very annoying especially when they start to interfere with your life. You can’t eat food that you want and have to take extreme care in choosing food to consume for fear of triggering the pain. Here are several steps to relieve and prevent teeth sensitivity.

  1. Choose The Right Toothpaste

The most obvious thing to do is to choose toothpaste made especially for sensitive teeth. There are many to choose from in the market. While such toothpastes might not work immediately, they’re definitely a step in the right direction. The important thing to remember is to keep using them. Don’t just use a tube and stop after it’s finished. It takes a while for teeth to get used to the toothpaste you’re using and for the medication to take effect.

  1. Rinse With Salt Water

A saltwater rinse has also been known to relieve the pain of sensitive teeth. Salt is an effective anti-inflammatory and antiseptic. You can gargle salt water twice in a day to relieve the pain. Honey and warm water is also another alternative. Honey is widely known to be a natural antibacterial and is used for wound management. It can help with the healing process and reduce inflammation.

Gargling hydrogen peroxide also helps because this compound is used as an antiseptic and disinfectant. It is used to clean cuts and burns to prevent infection. A mouthful of water and hydrogen peroxide solution can help reduce gum swelling and help it to heal faster.

  1. Switch To Soft Bristled Brush

Your toothbrush could also be a factor in your teeth sensitivity. Maybe switching from a hard bristle to a soft bristled brush can make all the difference. The manner in your brushing can also affect your teeth sensitivity. Brushing too vigorously could trigger pain receptors in the teeth. Make sure also to brush your teeth for two to three minutes. This will ensure that the active ingredients in the toothpaste take full effect.

  1. Avoid Acidic Food And Beverages

It’s also wise to avoid acidic food and beverages. Red wine, soda, fruit juices, pickled food, and fruits like oranges can greatly exacerbate your teeth sensitivity. These attack the enamel in your teeth causing pain. It’s best to avoid these food and drinks or at least minimize their intake. Brushing your teeth about 10 minutes after eating them will reduce their effect as well.

  1. Wear A Mouthguard To Stop Grinding

If you suffer from bruxism or teeth grinding, this can also aggravate teeth sensitivity. It is best to put a stop to it before it causes any further damage. Teeth grinding wears away the protective enamel of the teeth and exposes the nerve endings. The usual solution is wearing a mouth guard as you sleep or changing your position at night.

  1. Avoid Excessive Teeth Bleaching

Another culprit of your teeth sensitivity might be because of excessive teeth bleaching. More and more people are obsessed with achieving the Hollywood pearly whites. The treatment usually targets the enamel of the teeth to make them lighter. The pain usually goes away after the procedure but it’s best to talk to your dentist when you feel pain because they might be able to do something about it.

  1. Beware Of Gum Disease

Gum disease can also contribute to sensitive teeth pain. Receding gums expose the nerve endings at the base of the teeth which cause pain when they come in contact with something hot or cold – or even by hard brushing. Addressing this issue with your dentist can help relieve the pain of sensitive teeth.

  1. Practice Good Oral Hygiene

The best cure is prevention, as they say in the medical field. Preventing teeth sensitivity greatly depends on practicing good dental hygiene. Make sure to brush your teeth regularly using a soft-bristled toothbrush. Flossing also helps in the overall gum health. Using sensitizing toothpaste on your teeth right before you sleep can also help reduce sensitivity.

Author Bio:

Kerry Brooks, driven by the passion for blogging, loves to write about health care and beauty tips. She is currently working for mycomfortcaredental.com, Idaho’s #1 leader in Sedation Dentistry providing the best service in East Idaho.

The Connections Between Gum Disease And Overall Health

If you’re serious about your health, you likely spend a lot of time making sure your lifestyle choices are wise ones. That probably means you’re paying close attention to what you’re eating, getting enough exercise and sleeping regular hours. Yet for all of your smart decisions regarding your lifestyle, you may be doing yourself a disservice if you neglect to take care of your teeth. That’s because gum disease can have some surprising connections to your overall health. In fact, failing to care for your teeth and gums can lead to serious health problems.

For example, the bacteria that can develop in your mouth without proper dental hygiene can find their way into your bloodstream. This can lead to infections and a weakening of your blood vessels, increasing your risk of stroke. Periodontal disease also has been linked to other health complications including low birth weight, diabetes and even cancer. No matter how healthy the rest of your lifestyle is, taking care of your teeth and gums is not optional. Read the accompanying guide for more information about how your oral health can influence your overall health, along with some tips for keeping your teeth and gums healthy.

 

</strong><br /><br /><a href=’https://www.slideshare.net/rosenorthodontics/the-connections-between-gum-disease-overall-health’><img src=’https://image.slidesharecdn.com/jrosenortho-gumdisease-guide-180501174607/95/the-connections-between-gum-disease-overall-health-1-638.jpg?cb=1525196832′ alt=” 540px border=’0′ /></a></p>Infographic </a> </strong> created by <strong><a target=”_blank” href=”https://jrosenortho.com/”>Rosen Orthodontics</a>

Top 10 Common Dental Problems

You know good oral health starts with proper oral care. Brushing and flossing along with regular visits to your dentist Weybridge, all go a long way to keep your mouth healthy. But, if you’ve ever experienced sore gums or a toothache, you know that dental problems can occur even when you’re taking proper care of your teeth.

In fact, besides pain, dental problems can cause you some anxiety, especially when you don’t know exactly what type of issue you are experiencing. By educating yourself on the top 10 dental problems that most people experience, you can help prevent these issues or give yourself a starting point for a discussion with your dentist.

  1. Dental Cavity And Tooth Decay

Almost all adults will experience tooth decay during their lifetime, and approximately 25 percent of all adults have an untreated cavity. You may have a cavity if you notice:

  • Tooth pain
  • Food getting caught in your tooth
  • Your tooth feels rough
  • You experience pain when eating something cold or sweet

Your dentist can treat a cavity with a filling, crown, root canal or even the removal of the tooth if the damage is extensive.

  1. Bad Breath (Halitosis)

Everyone may experience bad breath from time to time, but chronic bad breath, known as halitosis, is more than just a nuisance. In fact, for most people, bad breath is caused by a dental condition. If you suffer from halitosis, you may be experiencing gum disease, cavities, oral cancer, dry mouth or have an abundance of bacteria on your tongue. You should seek out the care of your dentist when suffering from chronic bad breath.

  1. Periodontal/Gum Disease

Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is an infection of the gums surrounding your teeth. If you believe you have gum disease, you should seek a dentist for help. Gum disease has been linked to heart disease and is the leading cause of tooth loss in adults, so early treatment is crucial. If you notice symptoms such as bad breath, red, swollen or tender gums, bleeding of your gums, teeth sensitivity or bad breath, your dentist may be able to help.

  1. Oral/Mouth Cancer

If diagnosed early, oral (mouth) cancer may be curable for those who seek treatment early. If you notice symptoms such as sores, lumps, or rough areas in your mouth, a change in your bite, difficulty chewing or moving your tongue or jaw, you should seek help. Additionally, if you are a user of tobacco products and/oralcohol you should know these may increase your risk of developing oral cancer.

  1. Mouth Sores/Ulcers

While often annoying, most mouth sores or ulcers do not pose a serious problem to your dental health. Canker sores are a common problem that you may experience and only require treatment if they last longer than two weeks.

  1. Teeth Darkening

If you have a tooth that experiences trauma, for example, a blow to the mouth, you may notice your tooth changes color. This happens for one of two reasons: your tooth is trying to protect the nerve, or the tooth is dying. In both cases, you should seek help from your dentist so that he/she can assess the situation and make a recommendation for treatment.

  1. Infected Tooth Nerve

An infected tooth nerve occurs when bacteria infect the root of your mouth. This may manifest itself as a simple toothache but is a much more serious issue. You may develop an abscess and excessive pain if not treated immediately.

  1. Bruxism (Teeth Grinding)

You may have had a loved one tell you that you grind your teeth during the night, although this is not the only time that you may grind your teeth. This grinding of the teeth is known as bruxism. Without treatment, your teeth may become worn down, or you may suffer from toothaches, earaches, headaches or jaw pain.

  1. Chipped Tooth

There are several ways your dentist can fix a chipped tooth. He/she may smooth the tooth, provide a filling which matches your tooth color or use a veneer or crown. Chipped teeth should not be ignored as they may cause tooth pain or lead to further tooth damage if not treated.

  1. Enamel Erosion

Your tooth enamel can experience erosion when it is bombarded with acid. The acid breaks down the tooth and can cause sensitivity to hot or cold items or even more severe problems. This condition is easily preventable.

If you have questions about any of these 10 common dental problems, you should seek out the advice of your dentist. He/she can advise you on any issues you are suffering from and provide you with a proper treatment plan.

Author Bio:

Oatlands Dental Lounge is committed to making every patient’s visit as comfortable and personalized as possible. We consider our dental team, our patients and their families to be valuable elements – when you become part of the Oatlands Dental Lounge family, you become a very important person!

Can Gum Disease Treatment Improve Symptoms In Cirrhosis Patients?

A new study in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology suggests that routine oral care to treat gum disease may play a role in reducing inflammation and toxins in the blood and improving cognitive function in people with liver cirrhosis.

Previous research has shown that people with cirrhosis have changes in gut and salivary microbiota – bacteria that populate the gastrointestinal tract and mouth – which can lead to gum disease and a higher risk of cirrhosis-related complications. In addition, studies have found that people with cirrhosis have increased levels of inflammation throughout the body, which is associated with hepatic encephalopathy.

Researchers studied two groups of volunteers that had cirrhosis and mild-to-moderate periodontitis. One group received periodontal care including teeth cleaning and removal of bacteria toxins from the teeth and gums. The other group was not treated for gum disease. The research team collected blood, saliva and stool samples before and 30 days after treatment. Each volunteer took standardized tests to measure cognitive function before and after treatment.

Oral Inflammation Reduction

The treated group – especially those with hepatic encephalopathy – had increased levels of beneficial gut bacteria that could reduce inflammation, as well as lower levels of endotoxin-producing bacteria in the saliva when compared to the untreated group. The untreated group demonstrated an increase in endotoxin levels in the blood over the same time period. The improvement in the treated group “could be related to a reduction in oral inflammation leading to lower systemic inflammation, or due to [less harmful bacteria] being swallowed and affecting the gut microbiota,” the research team wrote.

Cognitive function also improved in the treated group, suggesting that the reduced inflammation levels in the body may minimize some of the symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy in people who are already receiving  standard-of-care therapies for the condition. This finding is relevant because there are no further therapies approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to alleviate cognition problems in this population, the researchers said. “The oral cavity could represent a treatment target to reduce inflammation and endotoxemia in patients with cirrhosis to improve clinical outcomes.”

Cirrhosis, which is a growing epidemic in the U.S., is the presence of scar tissue on the liver. When severe, it can lead to liver failure. Complications of cirrhosis can include infections throughout the body and hepatic encephalopathy, a buildup of toxins in the brain caused by advanced liver disease. Symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy include confusion, mood changes and impaired cognitive function.

How Teeth Gaps Affect Your Oral Health

Teeth gaps normally happen and many people oftentimes ignore them – especially young children. While some people say that teeth gaps make them feel and look young, teeth gaps or Diastema can actually affect your overall dental health. The misalignment can cause severe issues with your gums and jaw bones as well. Here are some facts about the impact of teeth gaps on your overall dental health to give awareness and stop common misconceptions that come with it.

Increases Chances Of Tooth Decay And Gum Disease

This can happen when food particles get stuck in between the gaps. The food particles will then break down and will slowly form into calculus and plaque. As the plaque continues to build up in between teeth, this can cause your gums to become vulnerable to bacteria. It can cause periodontitis or gingivitis and may worsen in time if left unattended.

People with larger teeth gaps may have higher chances of developing tooth decay. Larger teeth gaps have a higher tendency to accumulate more plaque. The accumulation of plaque will not only harm your teeth, but can also cause heart diseases that are associated with poor oral hygiene.

Problems With Oral Hygiene

Some people think that larger teeth gaps can help you maintain better oral hygiene. However, teeth gaps can cause severe issues and may lead to a myriad of oral problems if not treated. The teeth gaps can become a food trap, which then turns into plaque if not cleaned well. It can also be the reason for gum sensitivity due to constant brushing in between the gaps.

Misalignment And Jaw Pain

Misalignment and jaw pain are oftentimes caused by teeth gaps. Misaligned bites allow teeth to shift out of place. People with misaligned bites or crooked bites can experience chronic pain between the ears, forehead, and jaw. People suffering from misaligned bites can chip or wear off their teeth due to unequal force when they take a bite of hard food. It is very important that you have these gaps corrected to ensure that your teeth are not moving out of place.

Problems With Chewing

Chewing is another problem associated with teeth gaps. Large teeth gaps make it harder for you to chew food. The gums in between the gaps become sensitive when you continuously chew on a large chunk of food, making them susceptible to pain or infection.

Aside from the gum sensitivity, you can also experience an upset stomach due to consuming large chunks of food, making it difficult for your stomach to digest.

Lack Of Confidence

Another issue caused by teeth gaps is low self-esteem. People with teeth gaps often experience low self-esteem because they feel embarrassed to smile with their teeth gaps.

Teeth gaps may seem a normal occurrence for kids and young adults. However, it can cause severe damage if not closed properly. In some cases, these teeth gaps can be temporary, but there are instances when they become permanent. Thus, seek medical advice and oral treatment as soon as possible before your case worsens.

About The Author: Chloie Cartelli is a content writer for Orthofill whose expertise is focused on dental marketing. She graduated from the University of Connecticut and enjoys reading and writing that focuses on dental care.

The Link Between Gum Disease And Rheumatoid Arthritis

The results of a study – presented recently at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology – demonstrates increased levels of gum disease and disease-causing bacteria in individuals at risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). “It has been shown that RA-associated antibodies, such as anti-citrullinated protein antibodies, are present well before any evidence of joint disease. This suggests they originate from a site outside of the joints,” said study author Dr. Kulveer Mankia of Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Muscoskeletal Medicine and the Leeds Biomedical Research Centre. “Our study is the first to describe clinical periodontal disease and the relative abundance of periodontal bacteria in these at-risk individuals. Our results support the hypothesis that local inflammation at mucosal surfaces – such as the gums in this case – may provide the primary trigger for the systemic autoimmunity seen in RA.”

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects a person’s joints, causing pain and disability. It can also affect internal organs. Rheumatoid arthritis is more common in older people, but there is also a high prevalence in young adults, adolescents and even children – and it affects women more frequently than men. The prevalence of gum disease is increased in patients with RA and could be a key initiator of RA-related autoimmunity. This is because autoimmunity in RA is characterized by an antibody response to citrullinated proteins and the oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) is the only human pathogen known to express an enzyme that can generate citrullinated proteins.

The Study                                 

“We welcome these data in presenting concepts that may enhance clinical understanding of the key initiators of rheumatoid arthritis,” said Professor Robert Landewé, Chairperson of the Scientific Program Committee, EULAR. “This is an essential step towards the ultimate goal of disease prevention.” The study included 48 at-risk individuals with a positive test for anti-citrullinated protein antibodies, musculoskeletal symptoms but no clinical synovitis, 26 patients with RA, and 32 healthy controls. The three groups were balanced for age, gender and smoking. At-risk individuals underwent ultrasound assessment to assess for subclinical synovitis; only two were found to have ultrasound synovitis. Dentists examined six sites per tooth in each participant and a clinical consensus was agreed in each by three dentists.

Study: History Of Gum Disease Increases Cancer Risk In Older Women

Postmenopausal women who have a history of gum disease also have a higher risk of cancer, according to a recent study of more than 65,000 women.

The study, led by researchers at the University at Buffalo, is the first national study of its kind involving U.S. women, and the first to focus specifically on older women. It’s also the first study to find an association between periodontal disease and gallbladder cancer risk in women or men. The findings were published Aug. 1, 2017 in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

“This study is the first national study focused on women, particularly older women,” said Jean Wactawski-Wende, the study’s senior author, dean of UB’s School of Public Health and Health Professions and a professor of epidemiology and environmental health. “Our study was sufficiently large and detailed enough to examine not just overall risk of cancer among older women with periodontal disease, but also to provide useful information on a number of cancer-specific sites.”

Periodontal Disease Link

The study included 65,869 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative, an ongoing national prospective study designed to investigate factors affecting disease and death risk in older American women. The average age of the participants was 68, and most were non-Hispanic white women.

As part of a follow-up health questionnaire, participants were asked “Has a dentist or dental hygienist ever told you that you had periodontal or gum disease?”

Women who reported a history of gum disease had a 14 percent increased risk of overall cancer. Of the 7,149 cancers that occurred in the study participants, the majority – or 2,416 – were breast cancer.

“There is increasing evidence that periodontal disease may be linked to an increased cancer risk and this association warrants further investigation,” said the paper’s first author, Ngozi Nwizu, who worked on the research while completing her residency in oral and maxillofacial pathology in UB’s School of Dental Medicine and her doctorate in pathology (cancer epidemiology) at UB’s Roswell Park Cancer Institute Graduate Division. Nwizu is now an assistant professor of oral and maxillofacial pathology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

The risk associated with periodontal disease was highest for esophageal cancer, the researchers reported. “The esophagus is in close proximity to the oral cavity, and so periodontal pathogens may more easily gain access to and infect the esophageal mucosa and promote cancer risk at that site,” Wactawski-Wende said.

Gallbladder cancer risk also was high in women who reported a history of gum disease. “Chronic inflammation has also been implicated in gallbladder cancer, but there has been no data on the association between periodontal disease and gallbladder risk. Ours is the first study to report on such an association,” Nwizu said.

The esophageal and gallbladder cancer findings are significant, Nwizu said. “Esophageal cancer ranks among the most deadly cancers and its etiology is not well known, but chronic inflammation has been implicated,” she said.

“Certain periodontal bacteria have been shown to promote inflammation even in tiny amounts, and these bacteria have been isolated from many organ systems and some cancers including esophageal cancers. It is important to establish if periodontal disease is an important risk of esophageal cancer, so that appropriate preventive measures can be promoted.”

Periodontal disease also was associated with total cancer risk among former and current smokers. The findings for this particular age group are significant because they offer a window into disease in a population of Americans that continues to increase as people live longer lives.

“The elderly are more disproportionately affected by periodontal disease than other age groups, and for most types of cancers, the process of carcinogenesis usually occurs over many years,” said Nwizu. “So the adverse effects of periodontal disease are more likely to be seen among postmenopausal women, simply because of their older age.”

Study: Periodontal Disease Linked To Gallbladder Cancer Risk In Women

Postmenopausal women who have a history of gum disease also have a higher risk of cancer, according to a new study of more than 65,000 women.

The study, led by researchers at the University at Buffalo, is the first national study of its kind involving U.S. women, and the first to focus specifically on older women. It’s also the first study to find an association between periodontal disease and gallbladder cancer risk in women or men. The findings were published August 1st in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

“This study is the first national study focused on women, particularly older women,” said Jean Wactawski-Wende, the study’s senior author.

“Our study was sufficiently large and detailed enough to examine not just overall risk of cancer among older women with periodontal disease, but also to provide useful information on a number of cancer-specific sites,” added Wactawski-Wende, dean of UB’s School of Public Health and Health Professions and a professor of epidemiology and environmental health.

Gum Disease Study
The study included 65,869 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative, an ongoing national prospective study designed to investigate factors affecting disease and death risk in older American women. The average age of the participants was 68, and most were non-Hispanic white women.

As part of a follow-up health questionnaire, participants were asked, “Has a dentist or dental hygienist ever told you that you had periodontal or gum disease?” Women who reported a history of gum disease had a 14 percent increased risk of overall cancer. Of the 7,149 cancers that occurred in the study participants, the majority – 2,416 – were breast cancer.

“There is increasing evidence that periodontal disease may be linked to an increased cancer risk and this association warrants further investigation,” said the paper’s first author, Ngozi Nwizu, who worked on the research while completing her residency in oral and maxillofacial pathology in UB’s School of Dental Medicine and her doctorate in pathology (cancer epidemiology) at UB’s Roswell Park Cancer Institute Graduate Division. Nwizu is now an assistant professor of oral and maxillofacial pathology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

The risk associated with periodontal disease was highest for esophageal cancer, the researchers reported. “The esophagus is in close proximity to the oral cavity, and so periodontal pathogens may more easily gain access to and infect the esophageal mucosa and promote cancer risk at that site,” Wactawski-Wende said.

Gallbladder cancer risk also was high in women who reported a history of gum disease. “Chronic inflammation has also been implicated in gallbladder cancer, but there has been no data on the association between periodontal disease and gallbladder risk. Ours is the first study to report on such an association,” Nwizu said.

The esophageal and gallbladder cancer findings are significant, Nwizu said. “Esophageal cancer ranks among the most deadly cancers and its etiology is not well known, but chronic inflammation has been implicated,” she said.

Periodontal Bacteria

“Certain periodontal bacteria have been shown to promote inflammation even in tiny amounts, and these bacteria have been isolated from many organ systems and some cancers including esophageal cancers,” Nwizu continued. “It is important to establish if periodontal disease is an important risk of esophageal cancer, so that appropriate preventive measures can be promoted.”

Periodontal disease also was associated with total cancer risk among former and current smokers. The findings for this particular age group are significant because they offer a window into disease in a population of Americans that continues to increase as people live longer lives.

“The elderly are more disproportionately affected by periodontal disease than other age groups, and for most types of cancers, the process of carcinogenesis usually occurs over many years,” said Nwizu. “So the adverse effects of periodontal disease are more likely to be seen among postmenopausal women, simply because of their older age.”

 

Natural Home Remedies For Gum Disease

If you start to suffer from gum disease, it’s incredibly important you realize that you don’t have to shell out a ton of money and a dentist visit to get your mouth back to pristine health. There are many ways that you can properly and completely treat your gums. It’s believed that more than half of all Americans over the age of 30 experience some type of gum disease. This means that your oral care is even more imperative as you grow older. Here are some of the easy, inexpensive and natural ways you can treat gum disease if you suspect you have it.

Oil Pulling

This is a method that has been used for centuries, dating all the way back to ancient medicine. Certain oils have properties that are intrinsically antibacterial. The bacteria that lives and festers in your mouth is one of the leading causes of gum disease, it increases plaque build-up, and can lead to further oral issues like abscesses and tooth loss. It helps to pull harmful toxins and impurities directly from your mouth and gums. Oils such as coconut, sesame and olive oils are the best to use. Swish the oil inside your mouth for at least two full minutes with every use.

Turmeric And Garlic Paste

These two entities are incredibly helpful and beneficial to the gums. When you combine the two into a paste, it can be used like a toothpaste and thoroughly rinsed out of the mouth afterwards. Due to the naturally occurring elements in both ingredients, the antibacterial properties within them have powerful healing abilities. Not only will it help to clear the bacteria from your gums and teeth, but it will also help to eliminate the inflammation that is often a result of gum disease.

Aloe Vera Gel

We’re not talking about the bright green gel that you get in the bottle at the drug store – the kind that helps to relieve a really bad sunburn. No, we’re talking about the natural kind that comes straight from the plant without any additives or extra components. When it comes straight from the plant, it’s incredibly powerful and will help to heal your gums. You can brush your teeth lightly with it after brushing with regular toothpaste. You can also rub it against your gums or troublesome spots that are giving you a bit of a headache.

Salt Water

Many don’t realize the healing properties present in salt. Salt can be a major anti inflammatory aid when mixed with warm water. It’s also naturally antibacterial, which means it helps to eliminate and rid your mouth of the bacteria that caused the gum disease in the first place. Rinse your mouth with warm water and a teaspoon of sea salt twice a day in between brushes. This will also clear out all of the food particles that can often accumulate and aren’t always caught by the toothbrush.

Try the all-natural liquid toothpaste with a handcrafted blend of 100% pure cold pressed botanical almond, spearmint and carefully-aged peppermint oils. It naturally helps clean your teeth and gums by eliminating bacteria-causing germs and plaque while leaving you with fresh breath. Click here

 

Natural And Home Remedies For Gum Disease

The best remedies for gum disease are those that allow you to get rid of gum disease on your own at home. Any hygienist will tell you that they can clean the bacteria from your mouth twice a year, but the other 363 days a year are up to you to keep your mouth healthy and clean. The best treatment is daily prevention – specifically, using a daily oral hygiene program that includes brushing, flossing and rinsing. Be sure to select products that truly help, and use them in an educated manner for them to reach their full potential.

The Cost

Natural and home remedies for gum disease are typically very inexpensive compared to conventional therapies. Different techniques and treatments work in different ways. If one does not work for you, try out others to determine what is most effective.

Home Remedy Options

You’ve already seen how gum disease is directly correlated with numerous systemic health conditions. Treating gum disease from the inside out can allow you to address your gum disease in a way that improves the overall health of the entire body, not just a specific area in the mouth.

Bacteria Removal

  • Alcohol-free mouthwash can assist in the increased removal of bacteria from your mouth and tongue without drying it out.
  • Not only should you brush the teeth and gums, but you can also brush inside of the cheeks, lips, roof of the mouth and tongue for more efficient plaque removal.
  • Water flossing and oral irrigators can help reach areas that traditional brushing and flossing do not, stopping the advancement of gum disease.

Warm Salt Water Rinse

Salt water rinses with table or sea salt can allow an osmosis effect to occur, decreasing the amount of swelling in your gums.

Holistic Dental Options

Several types of essential oils are useful in treating symptoms of gum disease. You can place one or two drops of oil onto your toothbrush and rub it onto the area of concern or mix it with a glass of water to use as a mouthwash.

Common essential oils and herbs that aid in gum disease treatment include:

  • Peppermint
  • Almond
  • Spearmint
  • Eucalyptol
  • Menthol
  • Geranium
  • Lemon
  • Thyme
  • Marigold
  • Bloodroot

Diet And Supplements

Vitamin C
Foods rich in vitamin C can promote gingival healing and reduce the symptoms of gum disease.

Vitamin A
Oils such as those from olive and sunflower sources contain vitamin A, which can help promote a healthy immune system and increase healing in areas of gum infections.

Fibrous Fruits And Vegetables
Eating fibrous foods like apples and carrots not only helps cleanse and massage the teeth and gums as you eat them, but they contain nutrients that your body needs to have a balanced diet and healthy cardiovascular system.

CoQ10
According to The Mayo Clinic, CoQ10 may be an effective supplement to aid in the reduction of gum disease symptoms.

Altering Your Lifestyle
Refraining from consuming too many processed foods, refined sugars, and alcohol and tobacco products can improve your body’s immune system and activity level. Combined with increased activity from regular exercise, symptoms from both oral and systemic diseases are likely to improve.

Warm Salt Water Rinse

Salt water rinses with table or sea salt can allow an osmosis effect to occur, decreasing the amount of swelling in your gums.

More Gum Disease Remedy Facts
It is easier to cure gum disease while it is in the earliest stages of gingivitis or mild periodontitis. More severe stages of gum disease can be halted, but the damage that they incur cannot be undone.

Intervention to remove the infection and maintain a healthy oral environment can prevent the disease from progressing. In some cases there may even be a mild amount of tissue reattachment in areas where loss once occurred.

The only way to stop your gum disease from progressing further is to take action today. Delaying treatment or changes in your home care can allow the infection to continue or worsen. Even moderate changes to improve your oral hygiene habits can have an affect on gum disease, especially in its early forms.

Gum disease can be passed between family members, such as spouses and parents to children, making it even more important for you to treat and prevent the condition. While gum disease probably hasn’t ever been the explanation or cause of someone’s death, the condition does place you at an increased risk to suffer from other health conditions such as heart attack, stroke, diabetes and elevated blood pressure.

Delaying any type of dental care only causes the disease to progress to a more severe form, which typically results in more expensive treatment options. As gum disease is allowed to progress, it compounds into more severe forms of bone loss that are irreversible or require invasive treatments to prevent progression.

Smokers have a very difficult time treating their gum disease because of the atrophy that has occurred in the blood vessels surrounding the teeth. Many treatment regimens may not produce results. Even if bleeding is not present, severe disease can be present in smokers. To effectively treat your disease condition you should undergo a smoking cessation program.

Regardless of whether or not you’ve already lost teeth to gum disease, there is nothing like having your natural teeth, even if it is only a few. Dental professionals also recommend trying to retain as many natural teeth as possible for the most effective functions like speech and eating. You should attempt to heal your gum disease no matter how many teeth are left to prevent other systemic health problems.

Try the all-natural liquid toothpaste with a handcrafted blend of 100% pure cold pressed botanical almond, spearmint and carefully-aged peppermint oils. It naturally helps clean your teeth and gums by eliminating bacteria-causing germs and plaque while leaving you with fresh breath. Click here

How To Prevent Gum Disease

Gum disease is a preventable disease condition, but at times you may still find that even with proper care there may be areas in your mouth that are more prone to persistent problems than others. The most effective way to prevent gum disease is to have absolutely impeccable oral hygiene habits.

Brush Your Teeth

Brushing is something we all do, but do you do it the correct way? Using a soft-bristled brush isn’t always someone’s first method of choice, but it is the gentlest, safest way to remove plaque deposits from along the gum lines without causing tooth abrasion or gum recession. Gently angle the toothbrush 45 degrees toward the gum lines, making short back and forth motions. You should focus on only two or three teeth at a time and apply just enough pressure that the tissue blanches, no more.

High-quality electric toothbrushes can remove plaque more efficiently from your teeth than manual brushes. Because the bristles vibrate thousands of times per second they disrupt the plaque better than a few strokes back and forth with a manual toothbrush. These brushes work best when you hold the toothbrush in place on just two or three teeth at a time, allowing the brush to do the work for you.

Although conventional wisdom may tell you to use commercial toothpastes filled with fluoride and other chemicals, you may be surprised to learn of the potential dangers that go along with these substances.  It’s best to use toothpaste with natural botanical ingredients that will help destroy the bad bacteria on an ongoing basis.
It’s better to use toothpaste with natural ingredients that help destroy bad bacteria on a daily basis.

Floss Daily
Brushing does not remove plaque deep below the gums or between the teeth. If you do not clean these areas, you are placing your oral health at risk for an increased chance to develop tooth decay and gum disease.

To floss properly you should:

Use approximately 18 inches of floss, wrapped around the fingers or tied in a circle, allowing you to move to a “clean” portion as you go along

Wrap the floss in a “C” shape around each tooth

Glide gently up and down against your tooth, sliding under the gum lines

Allow the floss to slide down under the gums as deep as it will go, making three to four strokes against the side of the tooth

Come up over the gums before wrapping the floss against the adjacent tooth to prevent gum trauma

Gums that have gingivitis or periodontal disease will almost always bleed when flossed; an exception is in smokers, who almost always have no bleeding. If your gums bleed, continue daily flossing for approximately two weeks before expecting to see the bleeding stop.

Use A Water Floss

Water flossing with an irrigation device allows you to remove plaque between your teeth and under the gums without using traditional floss. The stream of water is actually believed to remove more plaque than traditional floss because it can reach several millimeters deeper under the gums in areas of gum disease. Traditional floss can only get about three millimeters under the gums, where water flossing is believed to reach up to seven millimeters below them.

Get Routine Preventive Screenings And Cleanings

Seeing your dentist and hygienist regularly can help identify areas of gum disease that you might have otherwise been unaware of, allowing for early intervention. Having your hygienist clean your teeth regularly will remove the calcified plaque deposits (tartar) from your teeth that contribute to the advancement of gum disease. Even people with exceptional oral hygiene will usually still develop small areas of plaque calcification. These tartar deposits cannot be removed on your own and require special instrumentation and training. When tartar is removed from the tooth, it creates a healthy gum environment that helps prevent the loss of bone support. Otherwise, the tartar accumulates and harbors bacteria that contribute to gum detachment.

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Gum Disease Dangers And Health Risks

Having gum disease doesn’t just affect the way your teeth look or feel, it can also make you more likely to suffer from severe health conditions in other parts of your body. Research shows a direct correlation in the severity of your gum disease and the severity of other health conditions.

Health concerns that are associated with gum disease include:

  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Diabetes
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Obesity
  • Premature labor
  • Low birth weight

If you suffer from any of these conditions along with gum disease, it places a strain on the body’s immune system and makes it difficult to battle a combination of conditions. Bacterial plaque from the mouth can enter into the blood vessels when gum disease is present, spreading to other areas of the body. These bacteria within your bloodstream can increase the likelihood of occurrences such as a heart attack.

Try the all-natural liquid toothpaste with a handcrafted blend of 100% pure cold pressed botanical almond, spearmint and carefully-aged peppermint oils. It naturally helps clean your teeth and gums by eliminating bacteria-causing germs and plaque while leaving you with fresh breath. Click here.

Gum Disease Signs, Symptoms And Stages

A combination of signs and symptoms may be present, depending on what severity of gum disease you have. Typically the early signs of gingivitis involve minor irritation such as bleeding or swelling of your gums.

Bleeding

Healthy gums should not bleed. If you floss regularly and brush along the gum lines, bleeding is not normal. However, infrequent flossing may always result in your gums bleeding due to the development of gingivitis.

Swollen Red Gums

Gums that are red, puffy or swollen are a sign of infection. Just as if you had another area on your body that was infected, swelling and redness would occur, alerting you to the condition.

Bad Breath

A bad taste in your mouth or bad breath may be a sign that there is biofilm or food lodged deep under your gums.

Gum Recession

The loss of your gum attachment causes the gums to creep slowly down the root of the teeth.

Tooth Mobility

As gum and bone loss occurs, your tooth has less stability. This may cause your teeth to shift into other positions or make them mobile.

Sore Teeth

When limited support structures are all that is holding your teeth into place, the delicate ligaments around your teeth can become strained.

Pus

Clear, white or yellow pus may begin to drain between your teeth and along the gum lines.

Stages Of Gum Disease

Gum disease starts out as mild gingivitis and progresses to different levels of periodontitis or periodontal disease. While all stages are part of the same disease condition, knowing how to identify gum disease developing in your mouth can allow you to be proactive about the treatment earlier on.

Gingivitis

The beginning stage of gum disease manifests itself as gingivitis. This is when you notice your gums bleeding during flossing and may have swollen or red gums just near the borders. Because gingivitis is just the initial inflammation of gums, it can easily be reversed within about two weeks.

Early Periodontal Disease

When gingivitis goes untreated, your gums begin to break down around the teeth. Early symptoms will include persistent inflammation, bleeding, and bone loss seen on your dental X-rays. You may also start to see mild gum recession in some areas. Early periodontal disease starts out localized, but if left untreated becomes more generalized throughout the mouth.

Moderate Periodontal Disease

This more advanced stage of gum disease is easier to spot. If you haven’t dedicated a lot of preventive care to your teeth, or do not see your dentist regularly, it may have allowed your condition to worsen without you realizing it. By the time you have developed moderate periodontal disease, gum recession is evident and there may be signs of tooth mobility. You may also start to notice dark areas between the teeth, where the gums have faded away.

Advanced Periodontal Disease

The most severe form of gum disease is advanced periodontal disease. Once you have lost several millimeters of bone around the teeth, your teeth become mobile, show severe signs of recession, and may even fall out. Specialized professional care is needed to delay tooth loss.

As if having different severities of gum disease were not enough, there are also variations to further describe the classification of your gum disease:

 

  • Localized Gum Disease – Restricted to a limited number of teeth in the mouth without having spread to surrounding teeth. Abnormal areas of bone loss are present in up to a few areas.
  • Generalized Gum Disease– Affecting most of the teeth in the mouth with generalized loss of surrounding bone structure throughout the entire mouth.
  • Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis– An ulcerative condition that involves necrotic “punched out” tissue, combined with swelling of the lymph nodes.
  • Hyperplasia– Thickness of gums associated with causes such as trauma, medication or irritation.
  • Pregnancy Gingivitis– Some women experience hormonal imbalances during their pregnancy, which results in the inflammation and bleeding of their gum tissues. This is usually atypical of their normal oral health, and it subsides after the birth of their baby.

Try the all-natural liquid toothpaste with a handcrafted blend of 100% pure cold pressed botanical almond, spearmint and carefully-aged peppermint oils. It naturally helps clean your teeth and gums by eliminating bacteria-causing germs and plaque while leaving you with fresh breath. Click here.

 

 

Gum Disease Causes

Do you know what causes gum disease? In order to understand the factors that contribute to gum disease, it is important to first understand the anatomy of the tooth, and how the gums relate to it.

Tooth Anatomy
Each of your teeth is designed to have a natural, shallow gum pocket surrounding it. This area is called the sulcus – pocket – or if disease is present a periodontal pocket. At the base of this pocket lies connective tissue including ligaments and bone. These structures adhere to the tooth, holding it into the socket. A healthy pocket will be no deeper than three millimeters.

The Invasion Of Bacteria
Plaque biofilm is a byproduct naturally produced by our bodies. As we consume food, that food mixes with our saliva and breaks down into smaller particles. Biofilm then begins to develop and deposit itself onto the surfaces of teeth, and along the gum lines. Plaque biofilm enters into the gum pocket during chewing or by accumulation in the absence of good oral hygiene.

The Destruction Of Gum Attachment And Bone Structure
When plaque is not removed efficiently through careful flossing or brushing, your body’s own immune system begins to attack the bacteria. As the blood supply brings antibodies to attack the biofilm under your gum lines, it destroys the attached gum around the tooth in order to access the area of infection. As this attachment is lost it causes your gum pocket to deepen, destroying bone along with it. After a certain point these pockets become too deep for you to efficiently care for them through normal brushing and flossing.

Heightened Risk Factors
Certain risk factors and health conditions can also contribute to the development and severity of your gum disease.  Some of these risk factors may include:

  • Age
  • Family history
  • Tobacco use
  • Diabetes
  • Stress
  • Osteoporosis
  • Cardiovascular disease

Try the all-natural liquid toothpaste with a handcrafted blend of 100% pure cold pressed botanical almond, spearmint and carefully-aged peppermint oils. It naturally helps clean your teeth and gums by eliminating bacteria-causing germs and plaque while leaving you with fresh breath. Click here.

Periodontitis Causes, Signs And Symptoms

 

What is periodontitis? Periodontitis is also known as periodontal disease or an advanced stage of gum disease. The meaning of the name describes the condition: perio = around; dont = tooth; itis = inflammation of. So periodontitis is the inflammation and infection of the area surrounding the root of the tooth. It is a severe condition that simply begins as gingivitis but ultimately leads to the destruction of gum attachment, bone and results in tooth loss if left untreated.

Causes

What causes periodontitis? Periodontitis is a natural immune response to bacteria along and underneath the gum lines around the teeth. When plaque biofilm is not removed effectively, antibodies from the immune system seek the bacteria out in order to destroy it. When initial symptoms of gingivitis are left untreated, the condition worsens into periodontitis. Simple swelling becomes an area of more advanced infection, causing the destruction of gum and bone attachment around the teeth.

Periodontitis may be due to:

  • Inadequate oral hygiene
  • Lack of professional preventive care (routine cleanings)
  • Susceptibility from conditions such as a family history of periodontitis, uncontrolled systemic health conditions or badly misaligned teeth.

Signs And Symptoms

Periodontitis is more than just gingivitis. Here are some warning signs to watch for if you suspect you may be developing the condition:

Bleeding Gums – Healthy gums should never bleed. Bleeding during brushing or flossing that persists for more than two weeks is a sign of gum infection such as periodontitis or more advanced gingivitis.

Bad Breath – The bacteria involved in periodontitis often contribute to halitosis, or breath malodor. Because the problem exists deep under the gums, mouth rinses, gums or mints do not easily cover it up.

Swollen, Red Gums – Gum lines become inflamed and red along the margins of the teeth when gum disease exists. Mild inflammation is typical of gingivitis, while more diffuse not concentrated or localized. Inflammation and redness (or even purple colored gums) is a sign of more advanced periodontitis.

Receded Gums – As periodontitis advances, the gums become detached from the teeth and creep down the surface of the roots, leaving exposed root surfaces. This makes teeth appear longer than normal.

Sore Teeth – Infection around the tooth may make chewing or applying pressure to the tooth uncomfortable.

Shifting Or Loose Teeth – When gum detachment or bone loss has occurred, it may cause the teeth to be mobile or shift out of their natural position.

Drainage Of Pus – During very advanced stages of periodontitis, there may be signs of pus that drains along the gum lines when the tooth or gums is depressed. Pus usually appears clear, white or yellow.

Try the all-natural liquid toothpaste with a handcrafted blend of 100% pure cold pressed botanical almond, spearmint and carefully-aged peppermint oils. It naturally helps clean your teeth and gums by eliminating bacteria-causing germs and plaque while leaving you with fresh breath. Click here