Winter Is The Best Season To Get Allergies Under Control

There is a misconception that allergies don’t affect sufferers in the wintertime. What many don’t think about when they hear about allergy and asthma is the triggers that don’t happen to be seasonal or environmental such as food allergies. While things like pollen aren’t typically high during this time of year, allergies and asthma can take place during any season.

Dress For Weather Warmth

The holiday season also happens to be cold and flu season. There are some ways that you can preemptively prepare for a random flair-up of your allergies and also get them under control for the coming season. A runny nose may be sparked by a virus that is going around, but it also may then trigger your allergic reactions such as sneezing, watery eyes and sore throat. Sometimes being sick does feel very close to having an allergic reaction that is typically called hay fever. Always stay as warm as possible, and don’t forget to button up your coats.

Chilly weather can be a real bummer when it comes to your health. Your nose can easily get stuffed up and cold while you navigate the packed retailers during the holiday season. Always dress appropriately for the weather.

Watch What You Eat

Be mindful of ingredients. There are so many holiday parties and fun festivities that reign during this time of the year. This means that you’ll have your fair share of food and then some. Depending on food allergies, this can get really tricky for some.

While many food allergies are found when individuals are much younger, sometimes allergies are developed later on in life. Make sure to keep your allergies in mind, as well as potential triggers for others in your close-knit circle of family and friends. No one wants to have a poor reaction that lands them in urgent care during the festive and fun holidays.

Watch What You Drink

Be wary of how much alcohol you drink. Some people don’t realize that the cloudy feeling that accompanies a hangover can also irritate your sinuses and spur on common allergy symptoms. Try not to go overboard on the open bars and bottomless champagne because those things can really catch up to you and make you feel sick in more ways than one.

It’s also important to note that often when someone’s face gets red while they drink it’s because they’re actually having an allergic reaction. They aren’t just getting warm or hot, their body is telling them that what they are putting in their system is simply not agreeable to them.

Consider A Fake Tree

You, or someone you know, may actually react poorly to the Christmas tree. This is the reason some opt for a fake tree. Sometimes people have a hard time with the strong odors. While you may love that Christmas tree smell, it isn’t exactly something that can’t negatively affect other people. Especially if the tree still happens to have pollen or mold spores on it somewhere.

There’s also something called terpene, which is found in the sap within a tree, that can be highly triggering to those who may have an allergy to it. If you notice you’re getting a bit stuffy when you get close to the tree, that may be the reason why. Treat your nose with warm water and a netti pot. It’s also recommended that if you are prone to asthma and allergies to have your inhaler and the appropriate dose of medicine on hand.

Foods That Fight Allergies

Vitamin E
Nuts, especially almonds, hazelnuts, and peanuts, are a good source of vitamin E, which helps to minimize inflammation. Eat a single one ounce serving of any of these nuts daily year round to help prevent symptoms. If you do have symptoms, increase the servings or add a few tablespoons of peanut butter as well.

Omega 3’s
Cold water fish like salmon, mackerel, trout, herring, and sardines as well as walnuts and flaxseed contain omega 3 fatty acids, which help fight inflammation. Eat at least two servings of cold water fish each week year round, and three servings during the seasons when you experience airborne allergies. Flaxseed can be added easily too, as it can be found in supplement form.

Zinc
Oysters, shrimp, crab, legumes, whole grains, and tofu are all high in zinc, which has antibacterial and antiviral effects that provide relief for immune systems that are overworked by fighting allergies. Have 6 oysters, 6 shrimp, or a few crabs each week, and twice that when allergies flare. Also have one serving of whole grains, beans, or tofu daily.

Tea
Whether green, white, or black, tea is full of flavonoids, plant compounds that reduce inflammation. Tea also increases proteins in the body that fight infection, again relieving an overtaxed immune system. Have at least one cup a day, and double that when allergies are in season. Have it early in the morning to stimulate the tiny hairs in the nose that keep pollen and dust away.

 

Dont Let Your Allergies Eat Away At You, Eat Them Away Instead!

 

Omega can be the Alpha to preventing seasonal allergies.

Studies have shown that people who regularly eat foods that are high in omega-3 fatty acids suffer less frequently from allergies than those who don’t. Omega-3’s can act as an anti-inflammatory, and naturally help keep airways from constricting and causing breathing problems related to seasonal allergies. Cold water fish are high in omega-3 but it’s important to remember that unlike man, not all fish are created equal. The most commonly available fish are usually farm raised, which means that they miss out on things that would be in their normal diet like algae. Try specialty groceries where fresh fish is brought in frequently to get the most benefit. This may carry a higher price tag, so you can also try fish oil supplements to get a healthy dose of omega-3.

 

As the weather begins to heat up, encourage your menu to follow suit.

Spicy foods can help to unclog nasal passages by thinning the blood and increasing its flow. This brings more oxygen to areas that are affected like the lungs and sinuses, and helps thin mucus. Whether it’s spicy mustard on your hot dog, or some extra wasabi the next time you go for sushi, cranking up the heat can help clear your head. You just might want to make sure you have a box of tissues handy if you’re cooking at home, or maybe ask your server for some extra napkins.

 

Are you lactose intolerant? You might wish you were.

Dairy products like milk and yogurt may be high in calcium, but their high protein can cause inflammation and excess mucus production. Try limiting these types of foods, or stopping consumption altogether when your allergies are at their worst. You can get a much more effective result by starting to remove dairy based foods from your diet by as much as six weeks, but if your allergies are particularly troublesome it’s always better late than never. Remember, you can always supplement this lack of calcium from dairy with green vegetables, beans, and even almonds. Also – be wary of extra wheat, and sugar as they, too, can cause excess mucus to form.

 

Everybody else seems to be going green, so why not hop on?

Green tea has become a popular beverage trend over the last few years, but do you know why? Not only is green tea loaded with antioxidants which help keep the body and immune system from breaking down, but it also contains a natural antihistamine. There has even been some evidence that people who regularly drink green tea may have lower chances of heart disease and certain types of cancer. Even if green tea in particular isn’t up your alley, most hot teas will still have calming effects and help reduce stress. The more stressed you are, the more likely your immune system will be to falter, so drink up.