How To Prevent Sore Gums

If sore gums are due to gingivitis and bacteria:

Brush the gum lines twice each day with your toothbrush angled 45 degrees toward the margin of the gums. Focus on two teeth at a time, making short strokes back and forth.

Apply just enough pressure to make the tissue blanch – no more, no less.

Floss daily by wrapping the floss tightly around each tooth and sliding up and down under the gums as far as it will go. This is usually two or three millimeters.

Have your teeth cleaned regularly at the dentist to prevent excess tartar buildup.

Consider using a mouth rinse after brushing to help eliminate any other bacteria, especially if you are prone to gum infections or have a history of gingivitis. Be sure to avoid mouthwash that contains alcohol, as it can actually contribute to more bacterial growth in the long run. This is due to the fact that alcohol can dry out the mouth, and a dry mouth is a preferred breeding ground for harmful oral bacteria. Instead, use a 100% pure botanical mouthwash that is proven to kill the harmful bacteria that cause gum problems.

Do you know the benefits of fluoride-free toothpaste?

Preventing other factors that can cause sore gums:

  • Clean oral appliances such as retainers and dentures daily.
  • Remove dentures or partials every night.
  • Have necessary dental treatment completed in a timely manner.

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Gingivitis Dangers And Progression

Gingivitis doesn’t just affect the appearance or discomfort of your gums, it can also greatly affect your entire body.

Links To Other Diseases And Conditions

Gingivitis, gum disease and periodontal disease are all caused by your body’s immune response to infection in the area. When your immune system is strained by infection, it also makes it difficult to fight other conditions that you may be suffering from. The more severe your gum infection is, the more likely you are to suffer from severe health problems. By treating or preventing gum infections like gingivitis, you can increase your body’s ability to recover from conditions such as:

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Arterial plaque
  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Diabetes
  • Premature labor
  • Obesity
  • Erectile dysfunction

Progression Into Periodontitis

Because the beginning stages of periodontitis (periodontal disease) evolve from gingivitis, it is extremely important to tackle your symptoms before they can cause irreversible problems. If gingivitis is allowed to persist and goes untreated, the area becomes so infected that destruction of gum attachment and bone levels occur around your teeth. This attachment loss starts out small, allowing food to pack under your gums as well as tartar to build up on the root of your teeth. Ultimately the infection becomes worse and worse until you reach the point where there is so much bone loss that your teeth become mobile and may possibly fall out.

Once you have lost teeth due to periodontal disease it makes everyday things like talking, chewing and swallowing more difficult to do. Even with tooth replacement options there is never anything quite like having your natural teeth, and you may have some problems adjusting. Bone loss from gum disease is irreversible, so it is important to prevent periodontitis by treating your gingivitis as soon as you begin to experience symptoms.

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How To Prevent Dry Mouth

The prevention of dry mouth involves careful reading of prescription and over-the-counter medication labels. Literally hundreds of everyday drugs such as decongestant use may cause dry mouth.

Use alcohol-free oral hygiene products. Many over-the-counter mouth rinses contain alcohol, which may kill of bacteria but also dry out your mouth. When the mouth is dry, there may be an increased risk of decay or infection due to the washing action of saliva.

Stay hydrated and drink plenty of water. If you allow yourself to become dehydrated or don’t have a nutritionally balanced diet, your saliva flow may be compromised. Also avoid salty foods.

Keep your mouth free of bacteria. Boost your oral hygiene in order to help do the job of your saliva, thoroughly removing plaque buildup from around the teeth and gums.

Be sure to use a 100% pure botanical toothpaste and mouthwash that will kill harmful bacteria, promote natural saliva production and promote a healthy, balanced environment inside of your mouth

Treatment

Most treatment for dry mouth involves home tips and over-the-counter products that are targeted toward alleviating the symptoms of dry mouth. Common over-the-counter dry mouth remedies include:

  • Artificial saliva
  • Oral sprays, rinses or gels
  • Chewing Xylitol-containing gum

Conventional mouthwash for dry mouth or toothpaste for dry mouth may help to a degree, but many people complain that the products leave their mouth feeling slimy. The best alternative is to use a 100% pure botanical toothpaste/mouthwash combination that will promote a healthy environment in your mouth and support normal saliva production.

Home Remedies

  • Frequent sipping of water
  • Using essential oils as part of your oral hygiene routine
  • Management of gum infections and periodontal disease symptoms
  • Decreased salt intake
  • Avoiding medications such as decongestants that dry up saliva output

Candies and mints that contain sugar are not recommended as these can cause an increased rate of decay, especially for people who suffer from dry mouth.

Conventional Treatment
In severe cases, prescription medication such as pilocarpine or cevimeline may be used to manage xerostomia and get rid of dry mouth.

More Facts About Dry Mouth

If you have an extremely dry mouth, take a look at any medications that you’re using which could be contributing to dry mouth. Secondly, discontinue using any alcohol-containing products such as mouth rinses. Lastly, treat any symptoms of gum disease that you are experiencing and use botanical oils to help boost your saliva production.

Our mouth gets dry due to lack of stimulation or blockage of the salivary glands. This can be due to gum disease, systemic conditions, prescription medications or even anxiety. When your body is at rest, your salivary glands are as well. It is very common to have a drier mouth in the morning, but it should not be so dry that you can’t easily move your mouth without a sip of water.
Can dry mouth be a symptom of diabetes? Glucose levels may also alter your salivary flow. So yes, dry mouth is sometimes seen in people with diabetes.

Having dry eyes and a dry mouth could be a condition of medications that you are taking, or a symptom of underlying conditions such as Sjögren’s syndrome.

Dry mouth may also accompany many other conditions that you experience during pregnancy. Because of the increased risk of dental problems at this time – due to any vomiting – dry mouth may make it easier for you to develop dental problems. Stay hydrated and treat your symptoms of xerostomia. They ought to subside after you finish your pregnancy or breastfeeding.

Dry mouth should not be ignored. Having chronic dry mouth can increase your risk for dental diseases like tooth decay and periodontitis. It may also be a symptom of an underlying health condition.

Always choose sugar-free products, and ones that contain Xylitol if possible. These strengthen your teeth and won’t contribute to decay. If you’re looking to freshen your breath as well as treat dry mouth, you can use a drop or two of essential oils on your toothbrush two or three times a day.

Try the all-natural liquid toothpaste with a handcrafted blend of 100% pure cold pressed botanical almond, spearmint and carefully-aged peppermint oils. It naturally helps clean your teeth and gums by eliminating bacteria-causing germs and plaque while leaving you with fresh breath. Click here.

Receding Gums Causes

What causes receding gums? Gum recession is usually due to one of the following causes:

Gum Disease
When you suffer from gum disease, there is an active infection under the surface of your gums between them and your teeth. These bacteria are attacked by antibodies in your bloodstream, which creates inflammation, redness and destruction of the fibers that attach the gums to your teeth. As gum infections persist, the gums creep farther down the root surface due to destruction of attachment fibers.

Abrasive Tooth Brushing
Using a medium or hard-bristled toothbrush can cause more harm than good. Aggressive brushing – even with a soft-bristled brush – is traumatic to your gum tissue and can cause or advance existing gum recession.

Tobacco Use
Smoking makes it very difficult to manage gum recession and promotes loss of gum attachment. However, the use of smokeless tobacco is the most harmful method of tobacco use when it comes to receding gums. The abrasive ingredients inside of smokeless tobacco cause irritation to the tissue and are typically associated with severe gum recession in the area where the tobacco is most often held.

Tooth Misalignment
Crowded, misaligned teeth are at an increased risk to have gum recession. This may be due to excess force placed on them during oral hygiene, or it may be due to anatomical forces that encourage the loss of gums and bone around these teeth.

Grinding Of The Teeth
If you suffer from clenching or tooth grinding, your teeth tend to flex along the neck of the tooth, near the gum lines. This is typically seen as an abrasion in the tooth enamel, but it may also contribute to loss of gum attachment in areas where enamel is damaged.

Orthodontic Therapy
Teeth that are moved too rapidly may not allow proper reformation and transition of the supporting tissues around the affected teeth. This often results in unnatural bone loss around those teeth, followed by gum recession around the affected tooth. It may also cause destruction of the roots.

Oral Anatomy
If you’ve ever noticed the small strip of skin between your lower lip and your two front middle teeth, you should know that this frenum might also contribute to recession in certain cases. Rarely, the frenum may be exceptionally tight or short, causing increased stress on the attached tissue on the tooth. As a result this may pull over time and cause the gums to recede due to the tension.

Try the all-natural liquid toothpaste with a handcrafted blend of 100% pure cold pressed botanical almond, spearmint and carefully-aged peppermint oils. It naturally helps clean your teeth and gums by eliminating bacteria-causing germs and plaque while leaving you with fresh breath. Click here

 

Periodontitis Causes, Signs And Symptoms

What is periodontitis? Periodontitis is also known as periodontal disease or an advanced stage of gum disease. The meaning of the name describes the condition: perio = around; dont = tooth; itis = inflammation of. So periodontitis is the inflammation and infection of the area surrounding the root of the tooth. It is a severe condition that simply begins as gingivitis but ultimately leads to the destruction of gum attachment, bone and results in tooth loss if left untreated.

Causes

What causes periodontitis? Periodontitis is a natural immune response to bacteria along and underneath the gum lines around the teeth. When plaque biofilm is not removed effectively, antibodies from the immune system seek the bacteria out in order to destroy it. When initial symptoms of gingivitis are left untreated, the condition worsens into periodontitis. Simple swelling becomes an area of more advanced infection, causing the destruction of gum and bone attachment around the teeth.

Periodontitis may be due to:

  • Inadequate oral hygiene
  • Lack of professional preventive care (routine cleanings)
  • Susceptibility from conditions such as a family history of periodontitis, uncontrolled systemic health conditions or badly misaligned teeth.

Signs And Symptoms

Periodontitis is more than just gingivitis. Here are some warning signs to watch for if you suspect you may be developing the condition:

Bleeding Gums – Healthy gums should never bleed. Bleeding during brushing or flossing that persists for more than two weeks is a sign of gum infection such as periodontitis or more advanced gingivitis.

Bad Breath – The bacteria involved in periodontitis often contribute to halitosis, or breath malodor. Because the problem exists deep under the gums, mouth rinses, gums or mints do not easily cover it up.

Swollen, Red Gums – Gum lines become inflamed and red along the margins of the teeth when gum disease exists. Mild inflammation is typical of gingivitis, while more diffuse not concentrated or localized. Inflammation and redness (or even purple colored gums) is a sign of more advanced periodontitis.

Receded Gums – As periodontitis advances, the gums become detached from the teeth and creep down the surface of the roots, leaving exposed root surfaces. This makes teeth appear longer than normal.

Sore Teeth – Infection around the tooth may make chewing or applying pressure to the tooth uncomfortable.

Shifting Or Loose Teeth – When gum detachment or bone loss has occurred, it may cause the teeth to be mobile or shift out of their natural position.

Drainage Of Pus – During very advanced stages of periodontitis, there may be signs of pus that drains along the gum lines when the tooth or gums is depressed. Pus usually appears clear, white or yellow.

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Sore Gums: The Signs, Symptoms And Dangers

Sore, swollen and sensitive gums are symptoms of gum disease. Sensitive teeth and gums are often due to the buildup of bacteria along the margin of your gums.

Sore gums often appear as:

  • Inflamed, enlarged gum margins
  • Rounded gums between the teeth instead of sharp and pointed
  • Bright pink, red or even purple
  • Bleeding during brushing and flossing
  • Painful during brushing or flossing
  • Itchy gums

A sore mouth and gums is a signal to you that there is a condition going on in your mouth that needs your attention. Sore teeth can even become mobile or fall out if the infection is severe enough. Even if you have sore gums and tongue, it’s important to take action early on that may be uncomfortable at first to help eliminate the infection.

Dangers And Health Risks

Sore gums are a symptom of infected, swollen gums. This is usually due to existing gum disease on one or all of your teeth. Gum disease can be a complex condition that may make you more prone to suffer from conditions like:

  • Stroke
  • Heart attack
  • Elevated blood pressure
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Obesity
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Tooth loss
  • Bad breath
  • Diabetes
  • Premature labor

Try the all-natural liquid toothpaste with a handcrafted blend of 100% pure cold pressed botanical almond, spearmint and carefully-aged peppermint oils. It naturally helps clean your teeth and gums by eliminating bacteria-causing germs and plaque while leaving you with fresh breath. Click here

What Teeth Reveal About The Lives Of Modern Humans

When anthropologists of the future find our fossilized teeth, what will they be able to conclude about our lives?

Debbie Guatelli-Steinberg has an idea. She is a professor of anthropology at The Ohio State University who studies fossilized teeth to answer questions about the life history, growth, and diet of primates and our human ancestors, as well as the relationships between different species.

In a new book, What Teeth Reveal About Human Evolution (Cambridge University Press, 2016), she gives a broad overview of what scientists have learned about our ancestors from studying fossilized teeth.

As for the teeth of humans living today – well, it is a good thing we have modern dentistry. “We have teeth that were adapted for eating a very different diet than the one we eat today, at least in Western societies,” Guatelli-Steinberg said.

In the book, she noted that 99 percent of humans’ evolutionary history was spent eating foods that were hunted or gathered. Our current diets of soft, processed and sugary foods are nothing like the diets for which our teeth are adapted. “Problems like cavities and plaque buildup have been magnified tremendously in humans today,” she said. “Natural selection has not prepared us well for the kinds of food we eat today.”

In addition to having much higher rates of cavities and plaque, modern humans are much more likely to have misaligned teeth that require orthodontic treatment or surgery. “Soft diets do not stimulate jaw growth, and teeth, especially our third molars (wisdom teeth), become impacted,” she said. In fact, third molar impaction became 10 times more common after the Industrial Revolution than it was previously.

Researchers like Guatelli-Steinberg learn a lot about early humans and our ancestors through an examination of teeth. One reason that teeth provide so much information is simply that they are available. Teeth are the most preserved skeletal remains found in fossils. They are small and very mineralized, making them resistant to decomposition and able to maintain their original qualities, she said. Teeth also contain a record of a lot of aspects of their own development, including their chemistry and pathology.

“Teeth give us insights into a variety of aspects of evolution,” she said. For example, researchers study the structure of teeth – like bumps and grooves – to see how species are related to one another. Also, since the scale of dental development is related to overall development in most animals, researchers can use teeth to determine how long it took individuals of different species to grow to adulthood.

On the other end of life, researchers can study the amount of wear on fossilized teeth to get a very rough estimate of how old an adult was when he or she died. And, of course, there is much to learn about diets. Microscopic wear on the chewing surfaces of teeth can suggest what kind of food an individual ate. “Different kinds of food can require different ways of bringing the teeth together. As that happens, the food will mark the teeth in different ways, depending on their properties,” she said.

The chemical composition of the teeth themselves is revealing. Scientists can identify the stable isotopes and trace elements in fossilized teeth to determine an individual’s diet. Much of Guatelli-Steinberg’s own research has focused on using patterns of tooth growth to assess what life was like for the individuals under study. “Tooth growth is disrupted in periods of severe physical stress, such as illness or starvation, so teeth can be a window to challenges that our ancestors faced,” she said.

Other Findings

In a 2004 study, Guatelli-Steinberg and colleagues used a scanning electron microscope to compare fossilized teeth of Neanderthals with those of modern Inuits, or Eskimos. The researchers were looking for tiny defects – horizontal lines and grooves in tooth enamel – that suggest the individuals were experiencing stress. The results showed that Neanderthals did not have lives that were dramatically more difficult than those of the modern Eskimos – a finding that challenged traditional thinking at the time.

More recently, Guatelli-Steinberg has used a relatively new method of studying fossilized teeth to examine growth increments. The technique pioneered by anthropologist Tanya Smith, called X-ray synchrotron microtomography, uses a specialized imaging machine to see inside teeth without having to cut them up.

This allows researchers to create virtual sections of fossil teeth to see periods of growth, or when growth was interrupted, in increments as short as just a few days, she said.

Regardless of what new techniques are developed to study teeth, Guatelli-Steinberg said she expects future anthropologists will “likely have a field day” studying modern human teeth. “In various cultures today, we have people who notch teeth, inlay them with jewels or gold, lengthen them, file them down and remove them altogether,” she said. “One can only imagine what anthropologists will make of all the things we do to our teeth today.”

STUDY: Natural Tooth Repair Method Could Revolutionize Dental Treatments

A new method of stimulating the renewal of living stem cells in tooth pulp using an Alzheimer’s drug has been discovered by a team of researchers at King’s College London.

Following trauma or an infection, the inner, soft pulp of a tooth can become exposed and infected. In order to protect the tooth from infection, a thin band of dentine is naturally produced and this seals the tooth pulp, but it is insufficient to effectively repair large cavities.

Currently dentists use human-made cements or fillings, such as calcium and silicon-based products, to treat these larger cavities and fill holes in teeth. This cement remains in the tooth and fails to disintegrate, meaning that the normal mineral level of the tooth is never completely restored.

However, in a paper published in Scientific Reports, scientists from the Dental Institute at King’s College London have proven a way to stimulate the stem cells contained in the pulp of the tooth and generate new dentine – the mineralized material that protects the tooth – in large cavities, potentially reducing the need for fillings or cements.

The novel, biological approach could see teeth use their natural ability to repair large cavities rather than using cements or fillings, which are prone to infections and often need replacing a number of times. Indeed when fillings fail or infection occurs, dentists have to remove and fill an area that is larger than what is affected, and after multiple treatments the tooth may eventually need to be extracted.

A More Natural Solution

As this new method encourages natural tooth repair, it could eliminate all of these issues, providing a more natural solution for patients.

Significantly, one of the small molecules used by the team to stimulate the renewal of the stem cells included Tideglusib, which has previously been used in clinical trials to treat neurological disorders including Alzheimer’s disease. This presents a real opportunity to fast-track the treatment into practice.

Using biodegradable collagen sponges to deliver the treatment, the team applied low doses of small molecule glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3) to the tooth. They found that the sponge degraded over time and that new dentine replaced it, leading to complete, natural repair. Collagen sponges are commercially-available and clinically-approved, again adding to the potential of the treatment’s swift pick-up and use in dental clinics.

Lead author of the study, Professor Paul Sharpe from King’s College London said: “The simplicity of our approach makes it ideal as a clinical dental product for the natural treatment of large cavities, by providing both pulp protection and restoring dentine. In addition, using a drug that has already been tested in clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease provides a real opportunity to get this dental treatment quickly into clinics.”

 

A Closer Look At Gum Disease Treatments

Traditional treatment methods for gum disease typically involve one or a combination of several of the following procedures: deep cleaning/scaling and root planning, periodontal maintenance/prophylaxis, gum flap surgery, crown lengthening, local antibiotic therapy, prescription medications, orthodontic therapy or gum and bone grafting.

Deep Cleaning/Scaling And Root Planing
Most dental patients with moderate to severe gum disease will undergo deep cleanings at their dental office. A deep cleaning allows the patient to have their mouth numbed in order to allow the hygienist to comfortably remove all of the biofilm and tartar deposits deep below the gums. This procedure can be moderately uncomfortable, but local or topical anesthetics are usually used to alleviate any discomfort. Some soreness may follow the procedure for a day or two.

Most deep cleanings are only partially covered under dental insurance plans, leaving you responsible for the remainder of the charges. Deep cleaning procedures are performed and charged as four different quadrants (upper right, upper left, lower right, lower left).

Periodontal Maintenance/Prophylaxis
Periodontal maintenance and routine cleaning appointments are the best methods for maintaining gum health or managing cases of mild gum disease. Prophylaxis appointments are typical cleaning visits that you have every six months, but a periodontal maintenance visit is the term for a similar recall cleaning after a deep cleaning has been performed. These allow your hygienist to monitor your gum health and remove any new areas of bacteria.

Gum Flap Surgery
If gum disease is severe enough, you may need to see a periodontal specialist. The gums will be retracted to allow access for the removal of all bacteria that lies deep below on far portions of the root surface. Because this is an actual surgery there will be some recovery time needed for healing and discomfort.

Crown Lengthening
Another treatment for severe gum disease is crown lengthening. This procedure follows a gum flap surgery, but when your gums are put back in place, a portion of the tissue is removed in order to create a shallower gum pocket around the tooth. Shallower pockets are easier to keep clean, allowing you to better care for the diseased area. The result is a tooth that is longer in appearance with some exposed root surfaces. While it may be easier to care for the gum disease condition, it can result in aesthetic concerns and tooth sensitivity.

Local Antibiotic Therapy
Some types of locally-administered antibiotics can help areas of advanced gum disease respond quicker to deep cleaning or surgical procedures. After the medication is put in place you may need to wait up to two weeks before flossing the area. A separate dosage must be placed in each area of concern, so it cannot be used for more than a few locations. Some commonly used topical medications include:

  • Actisite
  • PerioChip
  • Arestin
  • Elizol
  • Atridox

Prescription Medications
Prescription medications such as mouthwash or oral antibiotics may be prescribed and are relatively inexpensive. You’ll want to be careful with mouthwash containing alcohol, because it can dry out the mouth. A dry mouth can be a breeding ground for bad bacteria – the very kind that can lead to gum disease and other oral health problems. Some commonly used prescription medications include:

  • Chlorhexidine
  • Tetracycline
  • Periostat

Topical drugs like mouthwash, such as chlorhexidine, may be used for approximately two weeks to help reduce inflammation and bacteria in the mouth. Rinses can be used throughout the entire mouth or placed on a toothbrush and used at the site of infection. Long-term use of chlorhexidine can cause staining of the teeth.

Orthodontic Therapy
Correcting misaligned teeth with orthodontic therapy (braces) has been shown to be part of a comprehensive treatment for periodontal disease. This is because it makes your teeth straighter and easier to keep clean. Crowded areas are more difficult to clean as they often harbor bacteria and are more likely to develop gum disease than areas where your teeth are aligned correctly.

Gum And Bone Grafting
Surgical procedures such as gum grafts or bone grafts may help to stabilize the support structures around your teeth. Gum grafting is typically best for areas of recession that suffer from tooth sensitivity and can at times be a moderately invasive procedure. Bone grafting is useful when there is advanced bone loss and you are at increased risk to lose teeth. Both of these grafts may be taken from your own body or from a donor bank.

Try the all-natural liquid toothpaste with a handcrafted blend of 100% pure cold pressed botanical almond, spearmint and carefully-aged peppermint oils. It naturally helps clean your teeth and gums by eliminating bacteria-causing germs and plaque while leaving you with fresh breath. Click here

Types Of Gingivitis

The different levels of gum disease are:

  • Gingivitis
  • Early Periodontitis
  • Moderate Periodontitis
  • Advanced Periodontitis

Gingivitis is the earliest and most simple form of gum disease. Thankfully you can also reverse and completely cure it! While it is less severe than other forms of gum disease, there are also various types of gingivitis. These include:

Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative (Trench Mouth)

This severe form of gingivitis is less common and occurs as severely ulcerated gums that appear to have “punched out” areas in the tissue. It usually includes a heightened immune response and involves inflammation of the lymph nodes.

Drug-induced

Medications that are taken can cause gingival “hyperplasia” or overgrowth of gum tissue. This condition is usually managed by addressing your medication needs with your primary care physician. In some cases there may be some gum modification through laser therapy by your dentist.

Hormonal

Some gingivitis is induced during pregnancy due to hormonal imbalances. Even with very good oral hygiene there may be some gum swelling and bleeding. Typically the condition will reverse itself after the baby is delivered.

Nutritional

Deficiencies such as anemia may cause pallor of the gums with heavy bleeding. If you are anemic and have bleeding during brushing or flossing, consider taking iron supplements and addressing your dietary needs. Malnutrition can contribute to various oral symptoms.

Plaque Induced

Inflammation and redness of the gums due to the presence of plaque biofilm.

Chronic

The most advanced stage of gingivitis that occurs before developing into periodontal disease.

Linear Gingival Erythema

Extremely red margins of the gumlines. There may not be bleeding present and oral hygiene may not improve the condition. It is commonly associated with HIV.

Fungal, Viral, Bacterial, Systemic Or Infectious Disease

Infectious diseases and other systemic conditions can produce symptoms of gingivitis due to the body’s response to the illness. Examples of diseases or infections that cause mucosal irritation include:

  • Herpes
  • Mononucleosis
  • Gonorrhea
  • Strep
  • Candida (fungal)
  • AIDS
  • Leukemia
  • HIV
  • Gingivitis can be localized or generalized, depending on the location. Localized gingivitis only affects one to a few teeth, while generalized gingivitis affects several areas or your entire mouth.

Try the all-natural liquid toothpaste with a handcrafted blend of 100% pure cold pressed botanical almond, spearmint and carefully-aged peppermint oils. It naturally helps clean your teeth and gums by eliminating bacteria-causing germs and plaque while leaving you with fresh breath. Click here.

 

Gingivitis Signs And Symptoms

If your gums are healthy, they appear coral in color and protrude as sharp, narrow papilla between the teeth. Gums along the margins of the teeth are completely smooth, following a natural contour along the tooth and bone.

The following conditions are symptoms of gingivitis:

  • Gums between the teeth (papilla) becoming round, swollen or blunted
  • Inflammation around the margin of the gumlines
  • Redness – ranging from a slightly darker pink to severely red or purple gums due to the blood supply under the diseased tissue area
  • Tenderness
  • Bleeding during brushing or flossing
  • People with darker skin pigmentation may have some spotted pigment areas on healthy gums. These areas of pigmentation usually appear brown and are completely normal.

Healthy gums do not bleed when you brush or floss around them. If your gums bleed, then you are either:

  • Not brushing and flossing often enough
  • Not brushing or flossing adequately or
  • Suffering from a systemic condition (such as anemia)

By correctly brushing and flossing on a regular basis for at least two weeks your symptoms should cease. If the symptoms continue to exist then you may have more advanced gum disease or need a professional cleaning to remove calcified areas of bacteria, which are called tartar or calculus. Once tartar exists on the teeth it cannot be brushed or flossed off. Only your hygienist or dentist can remove it and it will be necessary to have it removed before healing can begin.

Try the all-natural liquid toothpaste with a handcrafted blend of 100% pure cold pressed botanical almond, spearmint and carefully-aged peppermint oils. It naturally helps clean your teeth and gums by eliminating bacteria-causing germs and plaque while leaving you with fresh breath. Click here.

Can Common Bacterial Cause Of Gum Disease Drive Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Investigators at Johns Hopkins report they have new evidence that a bacterium known to cause chronic inflammatory gum infections also triggers the inflammatory “autoimmune” response characteristic of chronic, joint-destroying rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The new findings have important implications for prevention and treatment of RA, say the researchers.

In a report on the work, published in the Dec. 14 edition of the journal Science Translational Medicine, the investigators say the common denominator they identified in periodontal disease (gum disease) and in many people with RA is Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. An infection with A. actinomycetemcomitans appears to induce the production of citrullinated proteins, which are suspected of activating the immune system and driving the cascade of events leading to RA.

“This is like putting together the last few pieces of a complicated jigsaw puzzle that has been worked on for many years,” says Felipe Andrade, M.D., Ph.D., the senior study investigator and associate professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, who also practices at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center.

“This research may be the closest we’ve come to uncovering the root cause of RA,” adds first author Maximilian Konig, M.D., a former Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine fellow now at Massachusetts General Hospital.

A Common Factor

Medical investigators have observed a clinical association between periodontal disease and RA since the early 1900s, and over time, researchers have suspected that both diseases may be triggered by a common factor. In the last decade, studies have focused on a bacterium known as Porphyromonas gingivalis, found in patients with gum disease. However, while major efforts are currently ongoing to demonstrate that this bacterium causes RA by inducing citrullinated proteins, all attempts by this research team have failed to corroborate such a link, says Andrade. But his team has persisted on finding alternative bacterial drivers, he says, because of intriguing links between periodontal disease and RA.

For this study, the investigative team with expertise in periodontal microbiology, periodontal disease and RA began to search for a common denominator that may link both diseases. Initial clues came from the study’s analysis of periodontal samples, where they found that a similar process that had previously been observed in the joints of patients with RA was occurring in the gums of patients with periodontal disease. This common denominator is called hypercitrullination.

Andrade explains that citrullination happens naturally in everyone as a way to regulate the function of proteins. But in people with RA, this process becomes overactive, resulting in the abnormal accumulation of citrullinated proteins. This drives the production of antibodies against these proteins that create inflammation and attack a person’s own tissues, the hallmark of RA.

Among different bacteria associated with periodontal disease, the research team found that A. actinomycetemcomitans was the only pathogen able to induce hypercitrullination in neutrophils, an immune white blood cell highly enriched with the peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) enzymes required for citrullination. Neutrophils are the most abundant inflammatory cells found in the joints and the gums of patients with RA and periodontal disease, say the researchers. These cells have been studied for many years as the major source of hypercitrullination in RA.

  1. actinomycetemcomitans initiates hypercitrullination through the bacterial secretion of a toxin, leukotoxin A (LtxA), as a self-defense strategy to kill host immune cells. The toxin creates holes on the surface of neutrophils, allowing a flux of high amounts of calcium into the cell where concentrations are normally kept low. Since the PAD enzymes are activated with calcium, the abrupt exposure to high amounts of calcium overactivates these enzymes, generating hypercitrullination.

Previous Findings

The researchers previously found that a similar type of pore-forming protein that was produced to kill pathogens by host immune cells was driving hypercitrullination in the joints of patients with RA. These findings point to a common mechanism that is poking holes on cells, which may be relevant to the initiation of RA when the disease is being established, says Andrade.

As part of its study, the team developed a test using the bacterium and LtxA to detect antibodies against A. actinomycetemcomitans in blood. Using 196 samples from a large study of patients with RA, the researchers found that almost half of the patients — 92 out of 196 — had evidence of infection by A. actinomycetemcomitans. These data were similar to patients, with periodontal disease with approximately 60 percent positivity, but quite different in healthy controls, who only had 11 percent of people positive for A. actinomycetemcomitans. More strikingly, exposure to A. actinomycetemcomitans was a major determinant in the production of antibodies to citrullinated proteins in patients with genetic susceptibility to RA.

Andrade cautioned that more than 50 percent of the study participants who had RA had no evidence of infection with A. actinomycetemcomitans, which, he says, may indicate that other bacteria in the gut, lung or elsewhere could be using a similar mechanism to induce hypercitrullination.

Andrade further cautions that his team’s study only looked at patients at a single point in time with established RA, and that to prove cause and effect of A. actinomycetemcomitans and RA, more research will be needed to track the potential role of the bacteria in the onset and evolution of the disease, which can span decades. “If we know more about the evolution of both combined, perhaps we could prevent rather than just intervene.”

An estimated 1.5 million people nationwide live with rheumatoid arthritis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Current treatments with steroids, immunotherapy drugs and physical therapy help some by reducing or slowing the crippling and painful joint deformities, but not in all patients. The exploration of alternative treatment options is necessary.

 

Fear the Dentist? Try These Tips To Calm Your Nerves

Going to the dentist doesn’t top most people’s list of favorite things, and for some it is downright terrifying. It’s estimated that nine to 15 percent of Americans skip or avoid the dentist due to fear. Keenly aware of this anxiety, some dentists are using novel techniques to help patients overcome their fears.

Academy of General Dentistry member Tony Menendez, DDS, MAGD takes an unusual – and furry – approach to helping his patients battle dental anxiety by introducing them to his faithful dog Cassi.

For more than 15 years, Dr. Menendez has employed furry “assistants” who help boost spirits and calm nerves. Dr. Menendez’s therapy dogs are trained to gently rest their head in patients’ laps, or softly nudge their hands, requesting to be comforted, which offers a welcome distraction during oral procedures.

“The dog’s presence in the treatment room reduces anxiety and stress in everyone they meet,” said Dr. Menendez. “How can anyone fear dental treatment when they have a wonderfully calm four-legged assistant nuzzling their lap, requesting their head to be caressed and distracting them from their surroundings?”

Though most of his patients went out of their way to greet his canine assistant, Dr. Menendez always checks to make sure new visitors are comfortable with dogs. If they’re not, Cassi will happily curl up and out of the way.

Although not all dentists use therapy animals to calm anxious patients, Dr. Menendez offers suggestions of what to look for in an oral care provider:

Open Communication

Finding a dentist who welcomes feedback and an open dialogue can make all the difference when it comes to a nervous patient. By walking through a procedure, a dentist can help the patient understand what to expect and what is expected of them. Not knowing is often scarier than the reality.

Allowing adequate time to talk and answer all of the patient’s questions and allowing the patient to make an educated well-informed decision is so important. But it goes both ways. “Dentists are not mind readers,” says Dr. Menendez, so patients should speak up. Tell your dentist how you feel and don’t be afraid to ask questions.
Comfortable Physical Surroundings

Cramped or dark spaces can make patients feel uneasy. Find a dentist’s office with an open concept where nothing happens “behind closed doors.” Dr. Menendez has an open sterilization bay that allows patients to observe the proper handling of the instruments. Seeking out an environment of transparency will make patients feel more at ease.

Pleasant Sounds

Knowing that the sound of drills doesn’t exactly put a person at ease, Dr. Menendez avoids standard turbine drills in favor of electric for a quieter environment. Patients are also encouraged to listen to the music of their choice during procedures to tune out background noise.

 

How To Prevent Bleeding Gums

Straight and Aligned Upper Teeth

The best way to prevent bleeding gums is to have exceptional oral hygiene practices that include flossing each day and brushing twice a day for two minutes. It can also include other preventive measures such as over-the-counter or herbal mouth rinses. To kill the bacteria that leads to common problems such as bleeding gums, use a daily oral hygiene program along with a 100% pure botanical toothpaste. Gums will only bleed when there is infection or an underlying condition that needs your attention.

A healthy diet and lifestyle can also improve your immune system and reduce the likelihood of bleeding gums or other oral infections.

Conventional Treatment

Bleeding gums are commonly associated with tartar buildup, excess plaque on the teeth and poor oral hygiene. Because of this, routine preventive visits to your dentist can help you get your mouth cleaned thoroughly and put you back on track. Your dentist may also recommend a prescription mouthwash to reduce the symptoms. Cleanings typically cost around $100 with prescriptions around $20.

Home Remedies

Home remedies for bleeding gums are the best answer as any dentist will tell you. The most important aspect is to keep your mouth clean and free of plaque on a daily basis. To treat bleeding gums you should follow the exact treatment regimen for conditions like gingivitis. To stop gums from bleeding you can also apply antiseptics or essential oils to the area to reduce the bleeding. The use of essential oils can be useful for gum inflammation or other symptoms of infected gums. It may also be wise to take an iron supplement in the case that you are anemic, which can lead to even more bleeding gums.

More Facts About Bleeding Gums

Bleeding gums are not normal. When your gums bleed it is a sign that there is an underlying condition such as infection or disease. If your gums bleed when you brush or floss your teeth, it typically means that you are not removing all of the bacteria on a regular (daily) basis and it has resulted in a gum infection.

It can be very normal for pregnant women to suffer from bleeding gums throughout their pregnancy. Even with dedicated oral hygiene your hormone levels may contribute to this condition. However, if you were suffering from bleeding gums before your pregnancy, or your bleeding is also associated with bad breath or swelling, you are likely suffering from a gum infection.

Some over-the-counter mouthwash products can help treat the symptoms of bleeding gums, or your dentist may prescribe a strong mouthwash to reduce infection. Mouthwash may not be the full answer as it usually targets the area above the gums rather than the infected area below them that is causing the bleeding. Many over-the-counter mouthwash products also contain alcohol and sting when they are used. Also, dry mouth exacerbates bacteria problems. A better approach would be to use a combination toothpaste/mouthwash with no alcohol or potentially harmful ingredients.

Water flossers are also effective and efficient when it comes to daily oral hygiene for areas deep below the gums or between your teeth. Electric toothbrushes can be much better than manual brushes for keeping your mouth healthy. They clean more efficiently and help oxygenate the area along the gums to destroy bacteria.

Try the all-natural liquid toothpaste with a handcrafted blend of 100% pure cold pressed botanical almond, spearmint and carefully-aged peppermint oils. It naturally helps clean your teeth and gums by eliminating bacteria-causing germs and plaque while leaving you with fresh breath. Click here.

How To Remove Plaque From Teeth

The importance of proper and thorough oral care is unprecedented. The health of our teeth, gums and mouth is essential for a myriad of reasons. While all of us do get plaque, our own dental hygiene regimen determines how easily that plaque can be eradicated.

Plaque is the soft, sticky film that starts to build up on your teeth and against your gums. When teeth aren’t cleaned properly, layers of plaque can start to transform into what’s called tarter, ands this is often a cause for gum disease and other troublesome issues. Here are some natural ways you can remove plaque from your teeth.

Oil Pulling

While it’s obvious that dental hygiene should always include consistent brushing and flossing, there are other methods that are incredibly effective for eliminating plaque. Oil pulling is a practice that has been around for centuries as a way to properly support oral health. The oil helps to remove plaque from the teeth. One of the best oils you can use for this is coconut oil. This oil is both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory and is perfect for sticking to those deposits of plaque and neutralizing the bacteria that causes plaque to begin with.

Guava

That’s right, this fruit may be exactly what your teeth and gums need. There are anti-plaque agents within guava that help to rid the accumulation of plaque on your teeth. A study conducted by the Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences found that guava leaf extract contributed to a reduction of plaque. The leaf and the fruit are naturally antibacterial and can inhibit biofilm which is what causes the appearance of plaque.

Aloe Vera

While many people are aware of the positive effects that this component has on the skin, it can actually be a fantastic dental aid as well. Aloe vera is known to be a great way to fight gum disease by eliminating both plaque and hardened tarter. It’s also a great way to ensure fresh breath. Just rub the pulp of the aloe vera leaf over the gums and bottom of the teeth, letting it sit for at least 10 minutes and then brush teeth as normal. You will have your teeth battling less and less plaque the more you use this method.

Orange Peel Oil

Many don’t realize that the peels of some fruits are actually just as beneficial as the nectar itself. This is definitely the case with oranges. Orange peels successfully break down the plaque that often covers the enamel of the teeth. Also, the vitamin C component is able to prevent certain microorganisms from forming on or around your teeth. While fresh orange peels are the best option for this method, they aren’t necessarily very practical. Because of this, the orange peel oil is the next best option. Just rubbing some on the gums and at the bottom of the teeth before you brush them will do so much to dissolve pockets of plaque that lurk in hard-to-reach places.

Try the all-natural liquid toothpaste with a handcrafted blend of 100% pure cold pressed botanical almond, spearmint and carefully-aged peppermint oils. It naturally helps clean your teeth and gums by eliminating bacteria-causing germs and plaque while leaving you with fresh breath. Click here.